2014 - 2019

  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Pauline Norris

    University of Otago

    Exploring the Needs of Pacific Families Affected by Age-Related Cognitive Impairment (BRNZ CoRE)

    Project with Brain Research New Zealand (BRNZ)

    Pacific people are projected to comprise 10% of New Zealand’s population by 2026. [1] They remain a youthful population, with almost half of the population (46.1%) under 20 years of age, compared with only 27.4% of the total population. [1] Furthermore, Pacific peoples currently make up 2.4% of the 65+ population, and this is expected to increase to 63% by 2026. [2] Even though Pacific populations in New Zealand are ageing, little is known about Pacific people’s experiences or, or views about, cognitive impairment. The principal aim of this research is to explore the needs of Pacific people and families affected by age-related cognitive impairment. It will also document existing information and services available, and used by, Pacific people and families affected by age-related cognitive impairment, and to explore unmet needs for information and services.

    This project is a first step towards identifying the unmet needs of Pacific people facing age-related cognitive impairment and the whānau who support them. It will also allow the identification of services currently being accessed. This will be useful when developing mechanisms for delivering any new preventative measures and early interventions.

     

    [1] Statistics New Zealand. 2013 census quickstats about culture and identity. Wellington, New Zealand: Statistics New Zealand; 2014.
    [2] Associate Minister of Health. Healthy Ageing Strategy. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Health; 2016.

     

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Rita Krishnamurthi

    Auckland University of Technology

    Long-Term Effectiveness of Health and Wellness Coaching (BRNZ CoRE)

    Project with Brain Research New Zealand (BRNZ)

    Current international evidence clearly demonstrates that at least 80% of strokes are preventable, with adequate control of modifiable risk factors. [1] However, despite the continuous decline in stroke incidence and mortality rates, the number of people (predominately older adults) affected by, and dying from, stoke is increasing in New Zealand and worldwide. [2] This study builds on an ongoing study, “Primary Prevention of Stroke in the Community Study” (PreventS), also funded by Ageing Well National Science Challenge, which investigates the effectiveness of Health and Wellness Coaching (HWC) to reduce absolute risk of 5-year Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) with Māori, Pacific Island, New Zealand European, and Asian participants. Participants were randomised to receive either 15 sessions of HWC over a 9-month period or usual care, the length of follow-up in this study was limited to 9 months. The current project “Long-Term Effectiveness of Health and Wellness Coaching” extends the length of follow-up to include an additional assessment at three years post-randomisation.

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term effectiveness of the HWC intervention in reducing CVD risk and prevention of cognitive impairment compared to usual care. The longer-term follow-up of participants in a trial of primary CVD prevention will inform on the suitability and sustainability of the HWC intervention once the intervention ceases. This approach has the potential of a 4-8% reduction in stroke risk, translating into 300-500 fewer strokes every year. This study will contribute further to the evidence obtained from the primary study that the benefits of the intervention are sustained long term. The data will provide the first evidence of any association of cognitive decline with cardiovascular risk factors in diverse ethnic groups in New Zealand.

    [1] O’Donnell MJ, Chin SL, Rangarajan S, Xavier D, Liu L, Zhang H, Rao-Melacini P, Zhang X, Pais P, Agapay S, Lopez-Jaramillo P, Damasceno A, Langhorne P, McQueen MJ, Rosengren A, Dehghan M, Hankey GJ, Dans AL, Elsayed A, Avezum A, Mondo C, Diener HC, Ryglewicz D, Czlonkowska A, Pogosova N, Weimar C, Iqbal R, Diaz R, Yusoff K, Yusufali A, Oguz A, Wang X, Penaherrera E, Lanas F, Ogah OS, Ogunniyi A, Iversen HK, Malaga G, Rumboldt Z, Oveisgharan S, Al Hussain F, Magazi D, Nilanont Y, Ferguson J, Pare G, Yusuf S. Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE): a case-control study. Lancet (London, England). 2016;388:761-775 2.
    [2] Feigin V, Forouzanfar M, Krishnamurthi R, Mensah G, Connor M, Bennett D, Moran A, Sacco R, Anderson L, Truelsen T, O’Donnell M, Venketasubramanian N, Barker-Collo S, Lawes C, Wang W, Shinohara Y, Witt E, Ezzati M, Naghavi M, Murray C. Global and regional burden of stroke during 1990& 2013; 2010: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The Lancet. 2014;383:245-255
  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Gary Cheung

    The University of Auckland

    Adapting Cognitive Stimulation Therapy for Māori & Pasifika People (BRNZ CoRE)

    Project with Brain Research New Zealand (BRNZ)

    Inequalities in health between Māori and non-Māori have nor improved in the last few decades, with New Zealand clinicians speculating that dementia prevalence is higher in Māori and Pasifika people.[1] Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) is an evidence based non-pharmacological treatment currently available for people with a diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia. It is a structured and manualised group cognitive intervention that involves 14 sessions (twice a week over seven weeks) of themed activities. These sessions are aimed to actively stimulate and engage people with dementia, while providing an optimal learning environment and the social  benefits of a group of six to eight participants with two facilitators. CST has been shown to improve cognition, quality of life and communication.

    The aim of this project is to adapt CST for Māori and Pasifika people with mild to moderate dementia. This project has direct relevance to Māori and Pasifika people who suffer from dementia and will involve interaction with different community groups and stakeholders associated with dementia care in Māori and Pasifika communities. The adapted Māori CST manual will be used to train CST facilitators to deliver evidence based treatment to Māori people with dementia. The availability of CST may encourage Māori people to seek help for their cognitive impairment and promote early diagnosis of dementia, benefiting the individual and their whānau.

     

    [1] Ministry of Social Development. Our ageing population. http://www.superseniors.msd.govt.nz/about-superseniors/media/key-statistics.html
  • Principal Investigators

    Marama Muru-Lanning

    University of Auckland

    Dr Tia Dawes

    University of Auckland

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Ngā Kaumātua, ō Mātou Taonga

    Supporting kaumātua health in a changing world: A feasibility study in Te Tai Tokerau

    Māori conceptions of ageing are traditionally positive and are a strength within many Māori communities. This feasibility study will build on this premise through a pilot study within the two Māori communities of Takahiwai and Ngati Wai. The study will generate emergent themes that are specific to Māori and will provide guidance and data suitable for inclusion within a larger subsequent study. Participants within this feasibility study will have the opportunity to define what it means to age well for Māori within the context of their own community and to contribute their understandings of ageing to broader discussions around ageing within New Zealand.

    The study will indicate whether participant selection procedures and data-gathering and analysis methods will provide the necessary data to draw conclusions around what it means to age well for Māori communities within the region. The project team has designed a research pathway that brings together kaupapa Māori methods with multi-sited ethnography, focus groups, individual interviews  and community disseminations. The proposed study will test the methodology of engagement with older Māori within their communities and the effectiveness of a kaupapa Māori approach in generating information that is applicable to the delivery of health and health-care recommendations to communities and health- care providers.

  • Principal Investigators

    Kirsten Aroha Gabel

    University of Waikato

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Te Whakahaumitanga

    Unlocking the potential of mātauranga to support Māori women ageing well within whānau

    The overall aim of this project is to consider the cultural context of ageing well for kuia, with specific reference to the value and esteem that kuia are held in and the essential roles that they have in facilitating whānau and hapu well-being.

     

  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Brendan Hokowhitu

    Waikato University

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Kaumatua mana motuhake

    The research seeks to address the mana motuhake (identity, autonomy) of kaumātua (older Māori aged 55 or older)

    It will investigate the health outcomes of a ‘tuakana-teina’ (mentoring) peer-educator model, and result in evidence-based interventions to meet social and health needs of kaumātua and their whānau.

     


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2019

    Oetzel, J. G., Hokowhitu, B., Simpson, M., Reddy, R., Nock, S., Greensill, H., Cameron, M.P., Meha, P., Johnston, K., Harding, T., Shelford, P., & Smith, L. T. (2019). Kaumātua Mana Motuhake: A study protocol for a peer education intervention to help Māori elders work through later-stage life transitions. BMC Geriatrics, 19(1), 36.

    2017

    Hokowhitu, B. (2017). Weaving past, present, and future. Journal of Indigenous wellbeing, Te Mauri- Pimatisiwin, 2(1), 2-3.

    Hokowhitu, B., Oetzel, J., Reddy, R., Smith, L., Simpson, M., Nock, S., et al. (2017). Kaumatua mana motuhake: Kaumatua managing life-transitions through tuakana-teina/peer education. In The New Zealand Medical Journal: Proceedings of the Waikato Clinical Campus Biannual Research Seminar,130, 108.

    Hokowhitu, B., Reddy, R., Simpson, M. (21-22 November, 2017). Kaumātua managing life-transitions through tuakana-teina/peer-education: From intervention to impact and implications. Research impact: Realising the potential, Dunedin, New Zealand.

    Simpson, M. (17 November, 2017). Kaumātua managing life-transitions through tuakana-teina/peer- support: An example of integrating student doctoral research with externally funded research. HOPE-Selwyn Knowledge Exchange for Research on Ageing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Reddy, R., Nock, S., Simpson, M. (13 October 2017). Kaumātua mana motuhake: Kaumātua managing life-transitions through tuakana-teina/peer-education outcomes of a pilot. AgeWise “In IT together”, Hamilton, New Zealand.

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Ofa Dewes

    The University of Auckland

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Value Older People in all Settings

    Tapinga ‘a Maama’

    Pacific older adults currently have high levels of unmet need and poor access to palliative care while dying.

    This study draws on Pacific health models to provide urgently-needed information on Pacific people’s experiences in palliative care, and the experiences and challenges faced by their aiga who carry out the bulk of their care. The research will improve end-of-life care for older Pacific People.

    I’ll Care For You

    The I’ll Care For You music video was created as part of a research project carried out by Dr Ofa Dewes in the School of Nursing at the University of Auckland. Pacific family carers that we interviewed told us they wanted a music video to convey their messages about the importance of supporting people in the community who care for their older relatives, including at the end of life. You’ll also find the song, I’ll Care For You written and performed by the Valiant Boys (check them out on YouTube) as well as the lyrics and a commentary (below under video) about the music video.

    Malia Hamani and Lata Fale of Treasuring Older Adults Inc. were instrumental in the creation of this video, as were our two caregivers, Suitupe Sorensen and Ana Johansson, and members of their families, who appeared in the video.

    For more information about the I’ll Care For You music video project, email Ofa Dewes, o.dewes@auckland.ac.nz

    These 5 digital stories were created as part of the “Tāpinga ‘a Maama*: Pacific life and death in advanced age” research project carried out by Dr Ofa Dewes in the School of Nursing at the University of Auckland. Following the interviews, family carers were invited to participate in the digital storytelling workshop. Each participant developed their own story about their experience of end of life care and these stories will be included in the study educational resources to give meaning and context to the combined key informant interviews.



  • Principal Investigators

    Mr Charles Waldegrave

    Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit

    Taimalieutu Kiwi Tamasese

    Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit

    Professor Chris Cunningham

    Massey University

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Value Older People in all Settings

    Loneliness and Social Isolation

    The aim of this project is to enable early detection of pathways that lead to loneliness and social isolation for older Māori and Pacific people in NZ and the mitigating factors that will facilitate social connection and enduring relationships during old age. Better-targeted services and policies will improve the quality of life of older Māori and Pacific people and increase the cost-effectiveness of services.

     

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr El-Shadan (Dan) Tautolo

    Auckland University of Technology

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Value Older People in all Settings

    Pacific Islands Families

    This study will use participatory action research methods to understand what factors older Pacific people consider important for their well-being and how those factors can improve in social and health system settings. Participant-proposed solutions and action plans will be developed and implemented, to enhance the well-being of older Pacific people

     

    Watch Dr Tautolo’s presentation, “Charting the life course of Pacific families” at He Ora Te Whakapiri symposium in 2018.


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2017

    Tautolo, E., Wrapson, W., Paterson, J., Wright-St Clair, V., Dewes, S. N. O., and Iusitini, L. (2017). Healthy Pacific grandparents: a participatory action research project exploring ageing well among Pacific people in New Zealand. Self & Society, 45(2), 134-148.

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Kay Saville-Smith

    CRESA

    Professor Jaqueline Cumming

    Victoria University

    Dr Robin Kearns

    University of Auckland

    Dr Beverley James

    Good Homes for Good Lives team

    Associate Professor Elsie Ho

    University of Auckland

    Dr Fiona Cram

    Katoa Ltd

    Enhance Age Friendly Environments

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Value Older People in all Settings

    Independence and Housing Tenure

    This research is about the future of older people in an increasingly diverse New Zealand where structural population ageing is taking place at the same time as a housing tenure revolution.

    Exploring the impacts of rental housing into the future.
    Exploring the impacts of rental housing into the future.

    From the highest rates of home ownership in the western world, NZ’s owner occupation rates are falling rapidly to levels that prevailed in the 1930s. How will this rising reliance on the (mainly private) rental market impact on older people into the future?

    We ask to what extent will reliance on the rental market:

    • Inhibit or support older people’s wellbeing and independence
    • Promote or reduce older people’s on-going social, economic and cultural contributions and reciprocities
    • Reduce or support the mitigation of mental, physical, or cognitive disability to maximise engagement and personal dignity

    Our research explores those impacts and dynamics.

    Diverse older people trends graph 650px

     

    Age Concern group work
    Age Concern representatives contribute to planning.

    We work with older people and stakeholders in New Zealand’s diverse communities to identify adaptive strategies and tools that will mitigate negative impacts and optimise opportunities for older people. We aim to not only add life to their own years but continue to be productive, contributing and valued members of their communities.

    This is multi-method research which combines demographic and quantitative data with working with older people and communities to explore the impacts of tenure on older people and community well-being.

     


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: June 2019


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2019

    Bates, L., Coleman, T., Wiles, J., & Kearns, R. (2019). Older residents’ experiences of islandness, identity and precarity: Ageing on Waiheke Island. Island Studies, 14(2), 171-192.

    Pledger, M., McDonald, J., Dunn, P., Cumming, J., & Saville-Smith, K. (2019). The health of older New Zealanders in relation to housing tenure: analysis of pooled data from three consecutive, annual New Zealand Health Surveys. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 43(2), 182-189.

    2018

    James, B. N. & Saville-Smith, K. (2018) Designing housing decision-support tools for resilient older people, Architectural Science Review.

    Saville-Smith, K. (28 February, 2018). Sustainability and Environment in an Ageing New Zealand Keeping Pace with Two National Science Challenges. Presentation for Ministry for the Environment, New Zealand.

    2017

    James, B., Saville-Smith, K. (13 December, 2017). Older Tenants, Advocacy and Research-based Tools. Presentation to Council of Christian Social Services and the Tenants Advocacy Network, New Zealand.

    James, B. (4 December, 2017). Marlborough Housing Needs. Marlborough Housing Group, New Zealand.

    McDonald, J., Pledger, M., Cumming, J., Dunn, P., Fraser, R., & Saville-Smith, K. (1-3 November, 2017). Ageing well in New Zealand – is the health of older people related to their housing tenure? 10th Health Services & Policy Research Conference, Surfers Paradise, Australia.

    Saville-Smith, K. (18 October, 2017). Unsustainable, Dysfunctional, and Costly Cities for an Ageing New Zealand. New Zealand Sustainable Cities Seminar, Wellington, New Zealand.

    James, B., Saville-Smith, K. (18 September, 2017) Housing in an Ageing Society . Presentation to Housing Stakeholders, Nelson, New Zealand.

    James, B., Saville-Smith, K. (18 September, 2017) Secure Housing as We Age. Presentation to Housing Meeting Tasman District, New Zealand.

    Cram, F. (30 May, 2017). He Whare Rīhi – Older Māori and Life When Renting. Presentation to the Mid-term Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Ho, E. (30 May, 2017). New Settlers Case Study: The housing experience of Indian elders. Presentation to the Mid-term Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Jackson, N. (30 May, 2017). NZ’s Tenure Revolution and its Ageing Society -New Zealand’s Renting Revolution-, Address to ‘Life when renting’ Mid term Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    James, B. (30 May, 2017). Older Renters in the Western Bay of Plenty and Tauranga. Presentation to the Mid-term Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Kearns, R., Coleman, T., Bates, L. (30 May, 2017). Older Renters’ Wellbeing: Waiheke Island case study. Regional Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K. (30 May, 2017). Landlords and the New World of Older Tenants. Regional Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K. (30 May, 2017). NZ’s Tenure Revolution and its Ageing Society. Regional Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K. (30 May, 2017). Dealing with ageing and our housing system. Regional Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K. (30 May, 2017). Enriching Relations between Landlords and Older Tenants. Regional Summit, Tauranga, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K. (18 April, 2017). Auckland’s Future: Dealing with ageing and our housing system. RIMU Insights, Auckland Council, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Saville-Smith, K., James, B. (15-17 February, 2017). Affordability, Health and Renting for Older New Zealanders. Australasian Housing Researchers Conference, RMIT, Melbourne, Australia.

    2016

    Saville-Smith, K. (29 September, 2016) Older People of Tomorrow Realising the Longevity Dividend. HCHA Conference, Te Papa, Wellington, New Zealand.

    Ho, E. (6-7 September, 2016) Migration, housing and wellbeing of older Asian people. International Asian and Ethnic Minority Health Wellbeing Conference 2016. University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.



  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Hamish Jamieson

    University of Otago

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Drug Burden Index

    The Drug Burden Index is a tool for health professionals to help predict the impact of side effects of medications.

    This project will assess if drug burden index (DBI) predicts adverse effects (such as falls and fractures) after taking into account other comorbidities that older people may have (such as poor mobility and reduced memory).

    Medications have benefits for patients. However, all medications have side effects.   Commonly now many patients are on multiple medications.

    The side effects of medications can lead to falls, fractures and potentially early admission into aged residential care. It is hard for health professionals to take into the account of all the side effects of medications.

    To deal with this a new scale has been developed call the drug burden index (DBI). This scale adds up the side effects of medications and presents it in a way that is easily interpretable to health professionals.

    The study will also have strong links with other research in the National Science Challenge and will assess if high amounts of medications are associated with loneliness, social isolation and depression.


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: December 2016


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2018

    Jamieson, H. A., Nishtala, P. S., Scrase, R., Deely, J. M., Abey-Nesbit, R., Connolly, M. J., et al. (2018). Drug burden and its association with falls among older adults in New Zealand: a national population cross-sectional study. Drugs & Aging, 35(1), 73-81.



  • Principal Investigators

    Professor John Reynolds

    University of Otago

    Professor Dirk de Ridder

    University of Otago

    Professor Leigh Hale

    University of Otago

    Dr Jonathan Shemmell

    University of Otago

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Electrical Stimulators for Stroke Recovery

    This study focuses to target this circuit and turn down its activity using an electrical stimulator implanted onto the brain opposite the stroke.

    A stroke is caused by the interruption of normal blood flow within the brain, and results in death of brain cells normally supplied by those blood vessels. Although rehabilitation leads to improvement in function, 85% of patients never regain full use of the arm and hand. To maximise recovery after stroke, surviving nerve cells in areas close to the stroke need to take over the lost function.

    However, this is difficult to achieve because of overactivity in circuits that tend to ‘turn off’ or ‘inhibit’ these surviving areas. One of these offending circuits originates in the side of the brain opposite the stroke.

    This study focuses to target this circuit and turn down its activity using an electrical stimulator implanted onto the brain opposite the stroke. We have studied this idea in models of stroke and found that our approach improves function. We now wish to determine if this approach will be feasible in humans who have arm and hand movement difficulties after stroke.

    We will apply this stimulation in conjunction with a physiotherapy programme, and we hope that this will lead to greater recovery of hand and arm function than can be achieved by physiotherapy alone.

     


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: May 2018



  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Valery Feigin

    Auckland University of Technology

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Stroke and CVD Prevention

    Strokes are the main cause of disease burden in older adults, yet evidence suggests more than 80% of strokes are preventable, with adequate control of modifiable risk factors.

    This proposal to test the effectiveness of Health and Wellness Coaching (HWC) for primary prevention of stroke is particularly relevant to the ageing population where most strokes occur.

    There is accumulating evidence suggesting that stroke and CVD prevention strategies should be aimed at reducing absolute risk and not individual risk factors in isolation. An important recommendation of current NZ Guidelines The Assessment and Management of Cardiovascular Risk32 is that people at >10% 5-year CVD risk should receive individual advice on healthy lifestyle modifications (e.g., healthy diet, regular physical activity, smoking cessation if relevant) by means of behaviour modification techniques. For people at >15% 5-year CVD risk, these guidelines additionally recommend aspirin, BP lowering medication and lipid modifying therapy.

    However, management of CVD risk factors remains suboptimal, and although up to 80% of all acute CVD events occur in people with low to moderate CVD risk the majority are not included in high-risk preventative strategies. Moreover, low participant adherence to recommended medications and healthy lifestyle modifications seems the main obstacle to effective CVD prevention. This project is a phase III, prospective, randomised, open-treatment, blinded end-point trial. Aim: to determine the effectiveness of HWC for primary stroke prevention in Māori, Pasifika, Asians and NZ Europeans.


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: June 2019


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2018

    Mahon, S., Krishnamurthi, R., Vandal, A., Witt, E., Barker-Collo, S., Parmar, P., … Feigin, V. (2018) Primary prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease in the community (PREVENTS): Methodology of a health wellness coaching intervention to reduce stroke and cardiovascular disease risk, a randomized clinical trial. International Journal of Stroke, 13(2), 223-232.

    2017

    Feigin, V.L., Norrving, B., and Mensah, G.A. (2017). Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease through population-wide motivational strategies: insights from using smartphones in stroke prevention. BMJ Global Health, 2(2), e000306.

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Hamish Jamieson

    University of Otago

    Dr Sally Keeling

    University of Otago

    Enhance Age Friendly Environments

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Risk Factors in Reduced Social Engagement

    This project will comprehensively assess the health and social needs of older people who are supported at home with community-based care.

    The interRAI Community Health Assessment tool will be used to identify risk factors for reduced social engagement of older people from different demographic groups, making gender, ethnic and regional comparisons.

    We will also assess possible interplay with other factors such as:

    • Living situation
    • Reduced cognition
    • Risk of falls
    • Reduced mobility
    • Pain
    • Depression and anxiety
    • Continence
    • Fatigue
    • Limitations in daily living activities

    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: December 2016


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2017

    Jamieson, H. A., Gibson, H. M., Abey-Nesbit, R., Ahuriri-Driscoll, A. , Keeling, S., and Schluter, P. J. (2017). Profile of ethnicity, living arrangements and loneliness amongst older adults in Aotearoa New Zealand: A national cross-sectional study. Australasian Journal of Ageing, 37(1), 68-73.

    2016

    Schluter, P. J., Ahuriri‐Driscoll, A., Anderson, T. J., Beere, P., Brown, J., Dalrymple‐Alford, J., … Keeling, S., Jamieson, H. A. (2016). Comprehensive clinical assessment of home‐based older persons within New Zealand: an epidemiological profile of a national cross‐section. Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 40(4), 349-355.



  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Martin Connolly

    University of Auckland

    Enhance Age Friendly Environments

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Value Older People in all Settings

    Retirement Villages

    This research project will investigate the needs and levels of healthcare use by retirement village (RV) residents.

    This project aims to:

    • Identify the age, gender and ethnic make-up of the RV residents and thereby assess the medical problems, and functional abilities of the residents.
    • Assess RV residents medically and functionally over three and a half years

    A sub-group of particularly vulnerable RV residents will be studied by conducting a randomised controlled trial of complex clinical intervention. Our aim is to reduce preventable hospital admissions thereby avoiding or postponing entry into rest homes and private hospitals.


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: June 2019

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Michal Lynn Boyd

    University of Auckland

    Enhance Age Friendly Environments

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Neurodegeneration and Individual Interventions

    This study investigates end-of-life neurodegenerative care and the potential benefits of individualised care

    Using interviews and surveys the study aims to determine the quality of death from families, GPs, and nurses’ perspectives.

    The goal is to translate evidence into practice by developing a palliative care guide for neurodegenerative conditions.

     


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: June 2018


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2019

    Boyd, M., Frey, R., Balmer, D., Robinson, J., McLeod, H., Foster, S., Slark, J., & Gott, M. (2019). End of life care for long-term care residents with dementia, chronic illness and cancer: prospective staff survey. BMC Geriatrics, 19(1), 137.

    2018

    Frey, R., Balmer, D., Robinson, J., Slark, J., McLeod, H., Gott, M., … Boyd, M. (2018) “To a better place”: The role of religious belief for staff in residential aged care in coping with resident deaths. European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 19, 89-99.

    2017

    Boyd, M. (14 October, 2017). Comparison of the end of life experience for those with cancer, dementia and chronic Illness in residential aged care in New Zealand: A retrospective, cross-sectional study. Nursing Home International Research Group Conference, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Merryn Gott

    University of Auckland

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Social Isolation

    This research project is about the understanding of social isolation and its effect on older people’s health and wellbeing.

    Approximately 10% of people over the age of 65 are lonely all or most of the time, with rates rising to 50% amongst those over 80. Loneliness has a negative impact on the health of older people and may even lead to premature deaths for the loneliest.

    Little is known about how loneliness and social isolation is experienced by Maori, Pacific and Asian older peoples who make up an increasing number of New Zealand’s aging population. Research is insufficient on efficiency of the existing volunteer and befriending services  in NZ.

    Age Concern is collaborating  on this project is to look at how their Accredited Visiting Service can better meet the needs of NZ’s multi-cultural population.

    The project has the potential to make an important scientific contribution to the understanding of social isolation of older people’s health and wellbeing, ensuring that the findings have an immediate impact upon the lives of older New Zealanders.


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: December 2018



  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Ruth Teh

    University of Auckland

    Maintain Wellness Independence

    Promote Social Integration

    Reduce the Impact of Disability

    Staying Upright and Eating Well

    Staying UPright and Eating well Research (SUPER), aims to test the impact and cost-effectiveness of physical activity and/or nutrition, and social group attendance, to reduce frailty and falls of older people.

    Life expectancy has increased in New Zealand and it is estimated 16.5% of the population will be aged over 65 by the mid-2020s.

    Frailty is a multidimensional geriatric syndrome involving several inter-related physiological systems.  It is a precursor to functional loss and results in considerably increased risk for health care needs.

    600 pre-frail older people to participate have been invited, including Māori aged 60+ and non-Māori aged 75+, living in Whangarei, Howick, Tauranga, and Invercargill.

    Participants will enroll in weekly group sessions, over 10 weeks.

    The groups are:

    • Strength and balancing exercise (Steady As You Go—SAYGO)
    • Nutrition and cooking class (Senior Chef)
    • A combination of SAYGO and Senior Chef (Combo)
    • Social activities (Social—groups gather for company and crafts, games, music or reading).

    The SUPER project aligns with the Ageing Well National Science Challenge mission by forestalling the development of frailty. This enables maintenance of independence. Preventing falls reduces disability and the related adverse impacts of poor health outcomes for older people.


    Related Information

    Anticipated End Date: June 2019