Health and Wellbeing in Ageing

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Hamish Jamieson

    University of Otago

    Reducing social isolation with big data

    The Phase 1 project “Risk Factors in Reduced Social Engagement” found many challenging social factors and loneliness in older people and indicators of early entry into aged residential care facilities, so a second data analysis project was funded to continue this area of investigation.

    “Reducing social isolation with big data” focuses on exploring longitudinal patterns and early risk factors to social isolation in older people using standardised interRAI assessment data. Dr Jamieson has obtained and prepared a very large dataset for analysis and identified two suitable analysis methods to answer the research question. He will use Structural Equation Modelling and Multi-stage Transition Modelling as suitable tools to establish patterns and identify potential early causal factors for developing loneliness and social isolation, and will identify potential healthcare interventions with collaborators at the Canterbury District Health Board.

    Findings from this project will have the potential to be used to modify the care plans of the 120,000 older New Zealanders who have an assessment using the interRAI.

    This study was funded under the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant. 


  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Merryn Gott

    The University of Auckland

    Promoting social connection through challenging public attitudes

    Promoting social connection through challenging public attitudes: a participatory project with older people

    The Phase One project, “Social Isolation and Loneliness” explored older people’s understanding and experience of loneliness, social isolation and social connection within the culturally diverse context of New Zealand. This resulted in a 5 minute animation titled Elder Birdsong  incorporating the research core themes. The current project aims to co-create with older people and middle school students a film about later life loneliness and social connectedness, focusing on the potential value of inter-generational social connection.

    This study was funded under Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant. 

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Ofa Dewes

    The University of Auckland

    Building connections as we age

    Building connections as we age: From younger carers to societies

    This intergenerational family caring phenomenon was identified as a significant area for future research in Dr Dewes’ Phase One project, “Tāpinga ‘a Maama: Pacific Life and Death in Advanced Age”.

    The current project aims to provide new evidence-based information to address the needs of younger carers caring for older adults to support the development of more effective and efficient provisions of responsive healthcare and social support services. This should produce better health, education and employment outcomes.

    This study was funded under Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant. 

  • Principal Investigators

    Associate Professor Michal Boyd

    The University of Auckland

    Developing an early warning system to recognise resident deterioration in residential aged care

    This work extends on the “Neurodegeneration and Individualised Interventions” project which used a co-design approach to develop the Frailty Care Guides. These guides were successfully completed and have recently been disseminated nationally. The current project seeks to complement the Frailty Care Guides by developing an evidence-based and user-friendly, Early Warning System (EWS) for early identification of residential deterioration in residential aged care (RAC). Currently, no systematic EWS exists for RAC in New Zealand.

    This study was funded under Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant. 

  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Ngaire Kerse

    The University of Auckland

    AWESSoM

    AWESSoM is the Ageing Well through Eating, Sleeping, Socialising and Mobility Programme, proudly funded by Ageing Well.

    Loss of independence is a key concern for older people of all nationalities. The AWESSoM programme integrates projects across population groups to maximise independence and push back the threshold of disability.

    A new LifeCurve TM phone app focussing on the way difficulties with daily activities are acquired will suggest to the user (older person) solutions to maintain or recover function. A social connector is developed to maximise utility of community resources for social engagement. Māori and Pacific people co-create health programmes to meet their needs and evaluation ensures impact. Care homes will trial a comprehensive oral health and cognitive stimulation programme. A new way of understanding health complexities using big data and novel analyses will lead to new treatment strategies to tackle complex multimorbidities. Themes of healthy sleep, oral health, mobility and cognition, complement social capital and community integration in a balanced programme involving older people across the ability spectrum.

    The AWESSoM team consists of teams from the University of Auckland, University of Otago, Tū Ora Compass Health, Allied Health Scientific and Technical Bay of Plenty District Health Board, The Centre for Health, Massey University, Auckland University of Technology, and Newcastle University in the UK.


    Publications &
    Proceedings

    2020

    Gibson, R., Gander, P. (2020). Factors associated with the sleep of carers: a survey of New Zealanders supporting a family member with dementia. Dementia, v20(3), 2021. doi: 10.1177/1471301220915071

    Gibson, R., Gander, P., Kepa, P. M., Moyes, S., Kerse, N. (2020). Self-reported sleep problems and their relationship to life and living of Māori and non-Māori in advanced age. Journal of Sleep Health, 6(4):522-528. doi:10.1016/j.sleh.2019.11.002

    Gibson, R., Helm, A., Breheny, M., Gander, P. (2020). “My quiet times”: themes of sleep health among family carers. Dementia, 20(6). doi:10.1177/1471301220980247

    van Kuijk, M., Smith, M. B., Ferguson, C. A., Kerse, N. M., Teh, R., Gribben, B., Thomson, W. M. (2020). Dentition and nutritional status of aged New Zealanders living in aged residential care. Oral Diseases, 27(2). doi:10.1111/odi.13536

    Thomson, W. M., Ferguson, C. A., Janssens, B.E., Kerse, N. M., Ting, G. S., Smith, M. B. (2020). Xerostomia and polypharmacy among dependent older New Zealanders: a national survey. Age and Aging, 27(20). doi:10.1093/ageing/afaa099

    Smith, L., Smith, M.B., Thomson, W. M. (2020). Barriers and enablers for dental care among dentate home-based older people who receive living support. Gerodontology, 37(3). doi: 10.1111/ger.12464

    Arthur, A.,  Savva, G. M., Barnes, L. E., Borjian-Boroojeny, A., Dening, T., Jagger, C.,  Matthews, F.E., Robinson, L., Brayne, C. (2020). Changing prevalence and treatment of depression among older people over two decades. British Journal of Psychiatry. doi:10.1192/bjp.2019.193

    Oda, K. Montayre, J.,  Parsons, J., Boyd, M. (2020). Oral care in hospital settings: Breaking the vicious circle of older adult deconditioning. Journal of Gerontological Nursing. doi:10.3928/00989134-20210507-01

    2019

    Gibson, R., Gander, P. (2019). Monitoring the sleep patterns of people with dementia and their family carers in the community. Australasian Journal of Ageing. doi:10.1111/ajag.12605

    Lundbeck, H.,  Smith, M. B., Thomson, W. M. (2019). Clinical validity of self-rated oral health among New Zealand nursing home residents. Gerodontology. doi:10.1111/ger.12458

    Ferguson, C. A., Thomson, W. M., Kerse, N. M., Peri, K., Gribben, B. (2019). Medication taking in a national sample of dependent older people. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy. doi: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.05.010

    Hyland, N., Smith, M. B., Gribben, B., Thomson, W. M., (2019). The residual dentition among New Zealanders in aged residential care. Gerodontology. doi: 10.1111/ger.12414

    Byles, J. E.,  Rahman, M. M., Princehorn, E. M., Holliday, E. G., Leigh, L., Loxton, D., Beard, J., Kowal, P., Jagger, C. (2019). Successful ageing from old to very old: a longitudinal study of 12,432 women from Australia. Age and Aging. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afz116

    Deelen, D. S., Evans, D. E., Arking, N., Tesi, M., Nygaard, X., Liu, M. K., Wojczynski, M. L., Biggs, A., van der Spek, A., … Murabito, J. M. (2019). A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple longevity genes. Nature Communications. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11558-2

    Hengeveld, L. M., Boer, J. M. A., Gaudreau, P., Heymans, M. W., Jagger, C., Mendonça, N., Ocké, M.C., Presse, N., Sette, S., Simonsick, E. M., Tapanainen, H., Turrini, A., Virtanen, S. M., Wijnhoven, H. A. H., Visser, M. (2019). Prevalence of protein intake below recommended in community-dwelling older adults: a meta-analysis across cohorts from the PROMISS consortium. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. doi:10.1002/jcsm.12580

    Gibson, R., Helm, A., Breheny, M., Gander, P. (2019). “I’m only as good as the sleep I get”: sleep health among family carers. Journal of Sleep Research, 28 (S1).

     

    Gibson, R. (2019). Sleep Disturbances Among Older Men and Women. Invited Symposia for Sleep Down Under, Sydney, Australia.

    Gibson, R. (2019). The Sleep Experiences and Disruptions of People with Dementia and Their Family Care Partners. Facilitated Symposia for Sleep Down Under, Sydney, Australia.

    Gibson, R., Helm, A., Breheny, M., Gander, P. (2019). “I’m only as good as the sleep I get”: sleep health among family carers. Oral presentation and poster to Sleep Down Under, Sydney, Australia.

    Gibson, R., Gander, P. (2019). Factors Associated with the Sleep of Family Carers. Oral presentation to Sleep in Aotearoa Conference, Christchurch.

    Gibson, R., Helm, A., Breheny, M., Gander, P. (2019). “I think I could have coped if I was sleeping better”: sleep across the trajectory of caring for a family member with dementia. Oral presentation to Sleep in Aotearoa Conference, Christchurch.

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Ruth Teh

    The University of Auckland

    Towards Optimising Vitality in Older Adults

    The aim of this project is to co-design a lifestyle intervention programme – “Ageing Well in Outdoor Gym” (AWinOG) with older Māori. Kaumātua will be involved in developing a conceptual framework for the programme at a two-day focus group.  Over a three month period kaumātua will carry out gardening activities and record observations related to strength, balance and flexibility. At the end of three months, the group will reconvene to review the process, data collected and formalise the programme.

    This study was funded under Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant. 

  • Principal Investigators

    Dr Katherine Bloomfield

    The University of Auckland

    Frailty Trajectories, Resilience and Quality of life in the Retirement Village Community

    This research aims to assess:

    • The effects of a multidisciplinary team intervention on frailty trajectories by repeating interRAI-Community Health Assessment (CHA) on the original Retirement Village intervention participants;
    •  Frailty prevalence and trajectories in all Retirement Village Phase One participants; and
    • The relationship between frailty, resilience and quality of life.

    The research will also validate quality of life (QoL) items in interRAI-CHA by a validated QoL tool, and assess the relationship between baseline frailty and healthcare outcomes, such as hospitalisations and entering residential care.

    This study was funded under Ageing Well National Science Challenge Emergent Opportunities grant.