Strategic Investment Initiatives

Strategic Investment Initiatives

Ageing Well National Science Challenge recognises the limits to the resource it can direct, and that there is value in working alongside other research funders and consortia that aligns with our vision and mission.

  • Principal Investigators

    Professor Karen Whitten

    Massey University

    Professor Simon Kingham

    University of Canterbury

    ACTIVATION: Activating Change through InterVentions for Active Travel in our Neighbourhoods

    ACTIVATION – Activating Change through InterVentions for Active Travel in our Neighbourhoods – is a major research collaboration that is investigating the impact of transport and community infrastructure on peoples’ health and wellbeing over four years. The project is led by Professor Karen Witten of Massey University and involves researchers from numerous universities and research groups across New Zealand.

    Active travel, such as walking, biking and using public transport, offers effective and equitable ways to increase physical activity across the whole population. ACTIVATION will investigate ways of “retro-fitting” the design of our cities that will encourage more active modes of travel and reduce car dependence.

    It is centred on two different urban sites, one in the North Island at Māngere in South Auckland and the other in the South Island at new developments in central Christchurch.

    In Māngere, a community with a high proportion of Pacific and Māori residents, the project will build on an intervention where neighbourhood streets designed for car use have been retro-fitted to prioritise active travel.  The project will work with Safe and Healthy Streets South Auckland (SAHSSA), a collaboration between housing, transport and community agencies. It will be a unique opportunity to investigate the impact of locally co-designed activities aimed at increasing the connectivity of walking and biking infrastructure on residents’ physical activity, social connection and safety.

    In Christchurch, research focussed on new higher density city building developments will investigate changes in travel practices associated with moving house to higher density central city living.  Interviews and surveys with residents and stakeholders will explore the factors that ensure success, such as attitude and behaviour change, and regulatory and institutional requirements. The research will inform ways in which transport and housing design can be integrated to encourage active mobility in urban regeneration programmes.

    This major research collaboration has been jointly funded by two of New Zealand’s National Science Challenges, Ageing Well and Healthier Lives, and will receive $2.443 million over four years.

    This study was funded under the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Strategic Investment Initiatives.


    Related Information

    https://www.ageingwellchallenge.co.nz/joint-funding-announced/

    Anticipated End Date: 2024

  • Principal Investigators

    Assoc Prof Barry Milne

    University of Auckland

    Lifecourse impact of chronic health conditions: a family and whānau perspective

    The two-year research project, ‘Lifecourse impact of chronic health conditions; a family and whānau perspective’ (the Lifecourse project), will help understand the wider benefits of chronic disease prevention, and determine what makes some New Zealand communities thrive despite living with chronic disease. It will have a particular focus on addressing equitable outcomes for Māori and Pacific people, and will also help lay the groundwork for studies in other communities.

    Specifically, the Lifecourse project will:

    • investigate the impact of chronic disease on the wider whānau at different life stages – from childhood and youth through to adulthood, as well as the later years of life
    • undertake an in-depth qualitative study of Tokelauan families to assess the family, household and community strengths that allow people in these communities to thrive despite the challenges of living in families with chronic disease (the NZ Tokelau population has high health needs but has seldom been the focus of research to address their health issues)
    • develop a framework for assessing the power of a kaupapa Māori early life and whānau programme, Te Kura Mai i Tawhitito transform Māori outcomes throughout the different life stages
    • develop a whakapapa-centred framework for undertaking intergenerational wellbeing research with hapū and iwi

    The Lifecourse project aligns with the goals of the three health-based National Science Challenges – A Better Start, Healthier Lives, and Ageing Well – with each Challenge contributing $500,000 – with a total project funding of $1.5 million.

    This study was funded under the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Strategic Investment Initiatives.


    Related Information

    https://www.ageingwellchallenge.co.nz/the-lifecourse-project/

    Anticipated End Date: 2022

  • Principal Investigators

    Katrina Bryant

    University of Otago / Te Runanga o Otakou

    Taurite Tū: achieving equitable injury prevention outcomes for ageing Māori

    For ageing Māori, falls are a leading cause of injury and leads to major impacts. ACC acknowledge there are inequities for older Māori accessing injury prevention and rehabilitative services.

    Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou (TRO) in collaboration with University of Otago falls and injury prevention researchers, have developed an effective falls prevention template for ageing Māori, Taurite Tū. Taurite Tū research outcomes demonstrate statistically significant improvement in falls risk and positive engagement of Māori community.

    TRO intends to further investigate how the Taurite Tū template can be further used as a platform for ACC towards broadly achieving equitable outcomes in other areas of Aotearoa for ageing Māori in injury prevention, improve access to ACC services and to injury rehabilitative services.

    As with the original Taurite Tū research, the proposed research will be guided by evidence-based, physiotherapy research findings, mātauraka Māori and use Kaupapa Māori Research methodology.

    This project was co-funded by Ageing Well National Science Challenge along with the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) and the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). This investment demonstrates a commitment to investing in vital research that addresses health inequities for ageing Māori.

    Taurite Tū is one of two projects that have been funded through this collaborative effort to improve specific areas of inequity, including co-designing effective injury rehabilitation, addressing barriers to accessing ACC services, as well as improving injury prevention initiatives.

    This study was funded under the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Strategic Investment Initiatives.


    Related Information

    https://www.ageingwellchallenge.co.nz/aw-hrc-acc-cofund-health-inequity-research/

    Anticipated End Date: 2023

  • Principal Investigators

    Joanna Hikaka

    University of Auckland

    Whaioranga te Pā Harakeke: Iwi-driven injury prevention and recovery for Māori

    Māori older adults are more likely to experience injury than non-Māori, yet less likely to effectively access ACC prevention/rehabilitation services, further increasing inequities in health outcomes.

    This project will use paeārahi (health navigators) who come from their own iwi and are upskilled to facilitate health delivery. This project will expand their roles to address injury prevention (e.g. falls exercises), ACC service access, and recovery and rehabilitation. It will use local knowledge and networks, and mātauranga Māori.

    Local hauora providers will facilitate paeārahi integration with older Māori communities across Te Arawa iwi boundaries. Access, activity and wellbeing outcomes will be tracked over time and paeārahi sustainability will be established.

    This project aims to build an evidence-base to support enhanced Māori older adult access/engagement with ACC services, and identify iwi-designed solutions to increase ACC responsiveness to Māori older adults with potential benefits for individual, whānau, hapū and iwi.

     This project was co-funded by Ageing Well National Science Challenge along with the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC) and the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). This investment demonstrates a commitment to investing in vital research that addresses health inequities for ageing Māori.

    Whaioranga te Pā Harakeke is one of two projects that have been funded through this collaborative effort to improve specific areas of inequity, including co-designing effective injury rehabilitation, addressing barriers to accessing ACC services, as well as improving injury prevention initiatives.

    This study was funded under the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Strategic Investment Initiatives.


    Related Information

    https://www.ageingwellchallenge.co.nz/aw-hrc-acc-cofund-health-inequity-research/

    Anticipated End Date: 2023