Category: Research

Innovative New Brain Study Will Benefit Whānau

New Funding Announcement

Text image that says new funding announcment. TeTe Roro: A Mātauranga Māori study. A project to explore a holistic view of Māori brain health and wellbeing utilising kaupapa Māori methods. The two logos of Ageing Well and Te Atawhai o Te Ao are represented at the bottom.

Two organisations committed to doing science differently – Ageing Well National Science Challenge and Te Atawhai o Te Ao – are pleased to announce a new collaboration to study Māori brain health.

Te Roro: A Mātauranga Māori study is a research project that approaches brain health in a holistic way, placing emphasis on mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), and being led by Māori for the benefit of Māori. It will draw on traditional sources such as whakairo (carvings), karakia (prayers and incantations), mōteatea (chanted song-poetry), and other sources to understand how Māori view brain health and well-being.

Most research in New Zealand has contributed to western frameworks and treatments for brain conditions such as dementia, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodiversity. In contrast, Māori have a holistic view of health and Te Roro seeks to address this, utilising kaupapa Māori methods to explore brain health and well-being. The research team includes mātauranga Māori experts who are embedded and trusted in the communities they serve.

“Te Roro is a unique opportunity for two organisations, Ageing Well and Te Atawhai o Te Ao, to build on our strengths and collaborate in world-class brain research that directly addresses the inequality Māori face in the health and medical system,” said Ageing Well Director, Associate Professor Louise Parr-Brownlie. 

“We are proud to facilitate a strong partnership where we are making a difference in the lives of whānau Māori, both now and in the future.”

Te Atawhai o Te Ao, an independent Māori institute for health and environment, will lead this research, utilising their extensive knowledge and networks to facilitate a merging of Indigenous knowledge and western science.

“This is a unique piece of work due to the Māori specific lens being used in the approach. Te Atawhai o Te Ao are looking forward to the opportunity provided by the Ageing Well National Science Challenge to undertake this research utilising our narratives to provide new context in this space,” said Dr Rāwiri Tinirau, Director of Te Atawhai o Te Ao and Principal Investigator of Te Roro.

The long term outcome of Te Roro study is to empower whānau Māori to maintain or improve brain health throughout their lifespans. The research aims to contribute to a revival of mātauranga Māori on the brain, as well as conceptualisations and re-conceptualisations of the brain and the body from a mātauranga Māori perspective.

Ageing Well Co-Director, Professor David Baxter, is buoyed by the collaboration’s opportunity to disseminate information and findings in numerous ways.

“This innovative research study puts traditional Māori methods, such as wānanga, whakairo, and whaikōrero, on an even footing with the outputs of western academic science, such as publications and reports,” said Professor Baxter.

“We are excited that the opportunity to pursue these avenues of research for both Ageing Well and Te Atawhai o Te Ao will generate knowledge to inform and improve the lives of all New Zealanders.”

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Filed under: Funding, Research

Research Spotlight: Helping Pacific Families Affected by Dementia

What do you do when a family member is diagnosed with dementia?
This is a question more Pacific families are having to face.

Though they remain a youthful group — almost half of Aotearoa’s Pacific people are under 20 — its population is also ageing at a relatively fast clip too. Not only will more Pacific people suffer from dementia in the next few decades, but there is also the suggestion that they may be experiencing cognitive impairments at younger ages than New Zealand Europeans.

The project, ‘Exploring the Needs of Pacific Families Affected by Age-Related Cognitive Impairment’, was jointly funded by Ageing Well and Brain Research New Zealand. It sought to examine the services available to support Pacific families looking after a loved one with dementia.

Principal Investigator Professor Pauline Norris, of the University of Otago, sought to discover what are Pacific families’ “unmet needs”—that is, when health and social service assistance is inadequate or absent – when dealing with the fallout of dementia.

In Pacific communities, older people play a key role as leaders in language and culture for their extended family and beyond. Yet, healthcare providers and support services indicated the needs of aged Pacific people experiencing cognitive decline are not being met.

The research showed that there were three main areas of concern: accessing services, getting a diagnosis, and communication/language.

What the study discovered was that many Pacific people experienced a lack of information and therefore access to services. The diagnosis was often made difficult by inconsistent access to general practitioners in lower socio-economic areas and long wait times. A lack of information in Pacific languages that incorporated a Pacific worldview made communication more difficult. There was also a lack of health workers across all sectors who spoke Pacific languages, and understood Pacific peoples’ cultural needs.

Dr Vanda Symon, Research Fellow with the University of Otago Centre for Pacific Health and researcher on this project, said there was also “a lack of awareness of the signs and symptoms of dementia”, therefore making it harder for family members to recognise what their loved one was experiencing.

“[The project] has really highlighted that there is a lot of need and that people’s needs are not being met for various reasons,” Dr Symon said.

By identifying the challenges facing Pacific peoples navigating the health care sector, changes can be made to ensure greater accessibility, communication, and support as they help their loved ones navigate life with dementia.

Read the recent Otago Daily Times article about the project.

Read the article about the research from our Celebration Book here or in the PDF reader below.

2021-Celebration-Book-Norris

Filed under: Research

ACTIVATION Getting Around Survey

A recent survey of residents living in a new social housing development in Christchurch has shown that three out of four residents struggled to afford transport costs from time to time, and seven out of ten people missed medical appointments, grocery shopping, or time with friends and family due to transport difficulties.

The survey was conducted as part of the ACTIVATION project, a major research initiative jointly funded by two National Science Challenges – Ageing Well and Healthier Lives – which is investigating ways of retro-fitting the design of our cities to encourage more active modes of travel. The research investigates the concept of shared mobility – that is the shared use of a vehicle or bicycle. The project focuses on two urban sites, one in the North Island at Māngere, South Auckland, and the other on the South Island in Christchurch.

“Shared mobility has the potential to be a really important part of a low carbon transport system. Yet we know little about the public’s interest and appetite for it, and also any co-impacts,” said Professor Simon Kingham, lead investigator for the Christchurch arm of the ACTIVATION project.

“For example, do people get more physical activity when they share transport? This project will help us understand more about these types of potential co-benefits.”

ŌCHT’s Brougham Village, Christchurch

The completion of a major social housing development in Christchurch in July 2021 enabled researchers to initiate the first phase of their South Island programme. Built by the Ōtautahi Community Housing Trust (ŌCHT), the new 90-home complex replaced Brougham Village which had been demolished following the 2011 Canterbury earthquake. This higher density city development in Sydenham offers a prime opportunity to learn which transport interventions would fit best with the needs of a new urban community.

ACTIVATION researchers based at the University of Canterbury, the University of Otago, and Lincoln University sought to understand the needs of the community around transport and so canvassed their views about an e-bike and car share scheme being established by ŌCHT.

Most residents thought that the shared transport scheme would be useful and planned to use it, but survey results indicated that further information about the scheme and its costs was needed. Fewer than half of the residents own their own car or bicycle.

ACTIVATION researchers Professor Simon Kingham and Dr Helen Fitt

“One of the key transport goals of government is to provide inclusive access to transport that enables all people to participate in society,” said Dr Helen Fitt, ACTIVATION researcher.

“That so many of our research participants reported that they cannot reliably attend medical appointments, access quality food, and meet with friends and relatives, demonstrates a substantial gap between the government’s aspiration and the lived experience of our participants.”

Solutions to these issues require a multi-agency approach, and Dr Fitt sees this as an important aspect of the ACTIVATION project.

“What really inspires me as a researcher is the opportunity to work with participants and the relevant agencies to figure out how to narrow this gap and improve outcomes for individuals and for society.”

ACTIVATION project researchers sought an accessible style to facilitate sharing the survey results. Dr Fitt was fortunate to participate in a Drawing Science Workshop with Toby Morris and Dr Siouxsie Wiles, hosted by The Spinoff and the Science Media Centre, and from this came the idea to communicate the survey findings in an illustrated format. The researchers partnered with illustrator Yasmine El Orfi to produce an engaging and informative leaflet that has been well received by the residents.

Christchurch offers a unique opportunity to investigate changes in travel practices associated with urban regeneration. Further interviews and surveys with residents and stakeholders will determine how the scheme might have aided the community in a year’s time. The results of this research will inform ways in which transport and housing design can be integrated to encourage active mobility in urban regeneration programmes elsewhere in the city and around the country.

2022-ACTIVATION-Getting-Around-Survey

 

Filed under: Research

Research Spotlight: Healthy Pacific Grandparents

Understanding older Pacific peoples’ views on ageing

Pacific people are the only ethnic group in Aotearoa New Zealand whose mortality rate has stagnated rather than decreased in recent years. Associate Professor El-Shadan (Dan) Tautolo – Director of the Centre for Pacific Health and research at Auckland University of Technology – sought to uncover Pacific peoples’ views on ageing, their needs, and the barriers they encounter to accessing healthcare.

The Healthy Pacific Grandparents study sprung out of the Associate Professor Tautolo’s directorship of the Pacific Island Families Study, a longitudinal study of the 1,400 Pacific children born in Auckland in 2000. Some of the grandparents of the children in the longitudinal study volunteered to take part in the Grandparents study, with almost 100 Tongan, Samoan, and Cook Islands Māori grandparents taking part over a period of more than two years.

Co-created, collaborative research

One of the hallmarks of Ageing Well research is co-creating the research with the community it serves, and the Healthy Pacific Grandparents study was no different. Genuine engagement was a critical part of the process, and the reciprocal nature meant that researcher-Grandparents gained skills and the researchers gained knowledge.

“By design, the Pacific Grandparents were not simply participants, but also ‘co-researchers’… leading the charge to fix the very health and wellbeing problems they faced,” said Associate Professor Tautolo.

About the research

The grandparents’ health priorities were somewhat unexpected. After much discussion, they wanted to focus on two achievable areas: foot health and literacy. Researchers set about supporting the participants to find ways to address these issues.

One of the study’s most important discoveries centred on the importance of culture. A strong cultural identity, the study showed, was good for Pacific peoples’ health. Those who were in sync with their culture has better health outcomes than those who lost their cultural mooring.

Associate Professor El-Shadan (Dan) Tautolo

All of the grandparent-researchers were “very happy with the project” and the way their involvement refined and improved services that existed within the community for older Pacific peoples. Associate Professor Tautolo’s team and the community of participants demonstrates the benefits of collaborative research partnerships, especially among a population that is often isolated and unheard.

Read more about the healthy Pacific Grandparents Project on the PDF reader below.

2021-Celebration-Book-Tautolo

Filed under: Research

Research Spotlight: Independence and Housing Tenure

The Independence and Housing Tenure Project: investigating how housing affects wellbeing, independence, social engagement, and dignity in older people

New Zealand used to boast one of the highest rates of home ownership in the western world, though now our owner occupation rates are falling rapidly to levels that prevailed in the 1930s. This movement of people from home ownership to the rental market has significant outcomes for older people and this was investigated by a team led by Dr Kay Saville-Smith, Director of the Centre for Research, Evaluation, and Social Assessment (CRESA).

The Independence and Housing Tenure study investigated the future of older people in an increasingly diverse New Zealand where structural population ageing is taking place at the same time as a housing tenure revolution.  

Dr Saville-Smith with the multi-disciplinary and multi-organisation research team who explored seniors’ lives when renting addressed several urgent questions related to these problems:

How will this rising reliance on the rental market impact on older people into the future?
}Will renting improve or hinder older people’s wellbeing and independence?
Will renting alleviate or exacerbate cognitive and physical impairments?
And what impact, if any, will renting have on older New Zealanders’ personal dignity and social engagement?

Dr Kay Saville-Smith, Director of CRESA

About the research

This multi-method research combined demographic and quantitative data with working with older people and communities to explore the impacts of tenure on older people and community wellbeing.

Dr Saville-Smith said of the experience, “One of the things that made this research innovative was the collaborative and enthusiastic nature of our stakeholders and seniors in helping build and test the tools we developed. They were heavily invested in their time and commitment to this research with us and were our partners in every step of the process.

“For the study, we assembled a team of expert researchers who each brought a differing experience and skill set to the table and this study was the result of a united effort,” she said.

The findings of this wide-ranging research have informed policymaking, raised awareness in the community, and also helped develop a new tool for older people: Life When Renting – Going for Good Rent.

The Life When Renting Toolkit that the team produced has recently been updated and you can find it at the new Office for Seniors website.

Read more about the project in our Research Spotlight on the Independence and Housing Tenure Project on the PDF reader below.

2021-Celebration-Book-Saville-Smith

Filed under: Research

Research Spotlight: Kaumātua Mana Motuhake

The Kaumātua Mana Motuhake Project:
empowering older Māori through peer education

word cloud for the KMM project


The Kaumātua Mana Motuhake Project project sought to address the mana motuhake (identity, autonomy) of kaumātua (older Māori aged 55 or older). It investigated the health outcomes of a ‘tuakana-teina’ (mentoring) peer-educator model, and result in evidence-based interventions to meet social and health needs of kaumātua and their whānau.

Led by Ageing Well Principal Investigator, Professor Brendan Hokowhitu of the University of Waikato, one of the innvovative aspects of this research was the research team partnering with the Rauawaawa Kaumātua Charitable Trust (RKCT). This partnership meant that KRCT was directly involved in the research, and they worked side-by-side with the research team. 

Read more about the project in our Research Spotlight on the Kaumātua Mana Motuhake Project here or on the PDF reader below. 

2021-Celebration-Book-Hokowhitu

The team has expanded their research in their Ageing Well Phase 2 funded programme, entitled ‘Kaumātua Mana Motuhake Poi’. For more information about the KMM Poi programme, please visit the KMM Poi website

Filed under: Research

New Ageing Well publication released

A new publication – ‘Aging in New Zealand: Ka haere ki te ao pakeketanga’, written by some members of the Ageing Well National Science Challenge Strategic Advisory Group has been released by The Gerontologist on 2 May 2020.

This manuscript summarises the ageing experience in New Zealand, including research strengths, unique datasets, funding opportunities and policies that support positive ageing. This manuscript will facilitate discussion amongst international gerontology researchers, funding agencies, and policy writers with the vision that they may identify solutions to trial or avoid when addressing the needs of their country’s older citizens.

Read this manuscript here.

Filed under: Publications, Research

News with Dr Hamish Jamieson

Dr Hamish Jamieson, Ageing Well NSC Principal Investigator, was recently filmed for a story for One News on the impact of COVID 19 on loneliness and older adults.

In this story, Dr Jamieson suggests the New Zealand government consider the timeframe of the lockdown period, as both mental and physical health are likely to deteriorate in older adults if lockdown extends.

You can watch this story here.

Read more about Dr Hamish Jamieson’s work, as well as other Ageing Well research, here.

Filed under: Press, Research

Frailty Care Guides Launched

Associate Professor Michal Boyd

Associate Professor Michal Boyd launched “The Frailty Care Guides” at The Selwyn Institute’s Gerontology Nursing Conference in Auckland on 4 October, 2019.  

The Frailty Care Guides were developed as part of Ageing Well National Science Challenge, in collaboration with the Health Quality and Safety Commission New Zealand. The project was led by Associate Professor Boyd. “Frailty is now recognised as a separate and distinct syndrome and there are many interventions that can help to increase a person’s resilience who are at risk of frailty.  The Frailty Care Guides provide concise guidance on common issues associated with frailty”, explains Dr Boyd.

frailty-michal-boyd

The guides comprise 26 practical tools covering the full spectrum of frailty, from deterioration and specific health concerns to communication and advance treatment planning. “I’m very excited to see the Frailty Care Guides launched. I know they will be a valuable resource for all providers that care for the complexity associated with frailty”, says Dr Boyd. The Frailty Care Guides can be used in any setting where people at risk of frailty receive care.

Ageing Well National Science Challenge, Director, Associate Professor Debra Waters, commented that “the launch and uptake of the Frailty Guidelines developed by Associate Professor Michal Boyd and her team in collaboration with the Health Safety and Quality Commission, is another example of impact from the research funded by the Ageing Well National Science Challenge.  We congratulate the team for this outcome that will positively affect the lives of some of our most vulnerable citizens.”

The launch of these guides was met with enthusiasm from the almost 300 people in attendance. The guides are available from the Health Quality and Safety Commission website: https://www.hqsc.govt.nz/our-programmes/aged-residential-care/projects/frailty-care-guides/

Filed under: Publications, Research

Research Featured in North&South

Dr Hamish Jamieson, an Ageing Well Principal Investigator, has had his research featured in April’s issue of North&South. 

The article (the cover story), which explores the issues of overmedication and overprescribing, drew attention to Dr Jamieson’s Drug Burden Index research.

Like the research study, the article noted a correlation between certain medications and falls risks.

Ageing Well is delighted that Dr Jamieson’s important research continues to generate interest from policymakers and stakeholders.

Find the magazine story details here.

Filed under: Press, Research

Improved access to greenspaces needed

Ageing Well Director, Associate Professor Debra Waters, is a co-author of a new study that argues older adults need improved access to green spaces (e.g. gardens, parks).

Further information

  • You can read more about the research in a media release from the University of Otago;
  • You can read the study article here:

Heezik, Y. van, Freeman, C., Buttery, Y., & Waters, D. L. (2018). Factors Affecting the Extent and Quality of Nature Engagement of Older Adults Living in a Range of Home Types. Environment and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013916518821148

 

 

 

Filed under: Publications, Research

Novel stroke treatment has scientists excited

Prof John Reynolds with Paul Robertson Linch

In a world-first, Professor John Reynolds and his team at Otago University have gone against traditional thinking, targeting the healthy side of the brain, rather than the area around the stroke, with electrical stimulation.

“Putting an electrode in the healthy side of the brain when someone has a stroke on the other side is really not a conventional thing to do,” Reynolds said.

“We are potentially putting something that could be risky on the good side.”

Studies show a third of the 9,000 people who have a stroke each year will never regain full movement.

Reynolds theorised that the healthy side of the brain was overcompensating for the damaged side, and inhibiting its recovery.

But to test his theory, he needed the help of the only man in the world with a patent for the technology – pioneering Belgian neurosurgeon Dirk de Ridder.

He had also tried to treat the damaged part of the brain, without success.

“So when John came up with this new idea to treat the healthy part in order to influence the diseased part. I thought it was a brilliant idea,” he said.

Otago University’s Professor John Reynolds consults 61-year-old Paul Robertston-Linch, who volunteered to wear a device designed to help with stroke recovery.

Together, they developed a novel device, and with funding from the Ageing Well National Science Challenge, were able to put it to the test.

During surgery, de Ridder places an electrode over the brain’s motor cortex, which controls movement.

A wire is tunnelled under the skin to the chest, where a stimulator is implanted – similar to a pacemaker.

“From a surgical point of view, it’s very safe. We don’t even see the brain because it is covered by the dura mater,” he said.

Two men volunteered to trial the device, including 61-year-old Paul Robertston-Linch.

Four years ago he had a stroke at work, which initially robbed him of his speech, and all movement down his right side.

Despite rehabilitation, he still couldn’t use his right arm and hand.

“I guess it fascinated me,” he said.

“I thought ‘I’ve got nothing to lose.'”

He can’t feel the stimulator at all, which is only activated by another device when he has physio.

Reynolds said the initial results are exciting.

The men couldn’t grip anything when they started, and at the end could lift at least 7kg.

More importantly, they had regained fine motor skills which can hamper stroke patients.

“The stimulator doesn’t make them better – it’s the rehabilitation. What we are trying to do is allow parts of the brain to wake up during that session and form new connections.”

Studies show a third of the 9,000 people who have a stroke each year will never regain full movement.

Reynolds theorised that the healthy side of the brain was overcompensating for the damaged side, and inhibiting its recovery.

But to test his theory, he needed the help of the only man in the world with a patent for the technology – pioneering Belgian neurosurgeon Dirk de Ridder.

He had also tried to treat the damaged part of the brain, without success.

“So when John came up with this new idea to treat the healthy part in order to influence the diseased part. I thought it was a brilliant idea,” he said.

Together, they developed a novel device, and with funding from the Ageing Well National Science Challenge, were able to put it to the test.

During surgery, de Ridder places an electrode over the brain’s motor cortex, which controls movement.

A wire is tunnelled under the skin to the chest, where a stimulator is implanted – similar to a pacemaker.

“From a surgical point of view, it’s very safe. We don’t even see the brain because it is covered by the dura mater,” he said.

Two men volunteered to trial the device, including 61-year-old Paul Robertston-Linch.

Four years ago he had a stroke at work, which initially robbed him of his speech, and all movement down his right side.

Despite rehabilitation, he still couldn’t use his right arm and hand.

“I guess it fascinated me,” he said.

“I thought ‘I’ve got nothing to lose.'”

He can’t feel the stimulator at all, which is only activated by another device when he has physio.

Reynolds said the initial results are exciting.

The men couldn’t grip anything when they started, and at the end could lift at least 7kg.

More importantly, they had regained fine motor skills which can hamper stroke patients.

“The stimulator doesn’t make them better – it’s the rehabilitation. What we are trying to do is allow parts of the brain to wake up during that session and form new connections.”

– Aotearoa Science Agency

Filed under: Press, Research

Research seeks to improve health outcomes of older Māori (kaumātua)

From Left: Prof. John Oetzel, Hoki Purcell, and Rangimahora Reddy

How can we support older Māori (kaumātua) to cope with significant life transitions? This is the question at the heart of Ageing Well-funded research undertaken between the Rauawaawa Kaumātua Charitable Trust (RKCT) and the University of Waikato.

And attendees at the pre-conference of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga in Auckland on Monday were treated to some answers from researchers Rangimahora Reddy, Hoki Purcell (both from RKCT) and Professor John Oetzel (Waikato).

Their research focuses on tuakana (older/experienced kaumātua) guiding teina (younger/less experienced) kaumātua through significant life transitions. The most challenging life transitions are when a spouse passes away, followed by a change in health (e.g. loss of independence), which alters how life is lived. The programme seeks to enhance social and health outcomes for kaumātua by supporting them to navigate these difficult transitions.

The researchers developed the kaumātua peer-support programme, with an orientation followed by three conversations between the tuakana and teina. The programme is kaumātua driven and wairua is at the heart of the relationship. Focus groups report that the programme has had a positive impact on their lives.

Further Research Information:

Research Project information: Kaumatua mana motuhake

Newsletter Profile: Professor Brendan Hokowhitu hopes to reframe how we think about ageing

Published: Wednesday 14th November 2018
Filed under: Events, Research

Call for Expressions of Interest

Expression of Interest: Guidelines & Application Form

 

Ageing Well is pleased to announce a call for Expressions of Interest as part of our Tranche 2, which will start in July 2019, subject to Government refunding the Challenge. Our future research will centre around two Focus Areas: Health and Wellbeing; and Ageing and Māori.

 

For more information, please check out our How to Apply page.

 

More details to follow.
Filed under: Funding, Research

MEDIA RELEASE – Life Course Research Symposium

MEDIA RELEASE

Wednesday 17 October 2018

He Ora Te Whakapiri – Life course research symposium

Human development is shaped by the physical and human environment at all stages of life, so life course research is vital for improving health and wellbeing outcomes. What is the future of life course research in New Zealand? How can we all contribute and be involved? Where is this research heading?

These questions will be addressed at a major symposium He Orate Whakapiri: Unleashing the potential of New Zealand’s life course research this week in Wellington. The conference will be opened by the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor, Professor Juliet Gerrard, at Te Papa on 18 October.

Hosted by the three health and wellbeing National Science Challenges, A Better Start, Healthier Lives and Ageing Well, this symposium brings together leading thinkers about life course research from New Zealand and overseas, and serves to create new synergies to apply innovative research to help New Zealanders live healthy and successful lives.

“Life course research takes researchers out of their comfort zones. It brings together people from disciplines that rarely meet. The goal is to generate new questions and new ways of asking questions about key stages in our lives from birth to our later years,” says A Better Start National Science Challenge Director Professor Wayne Cutfield.

The conference aims to achieve a discussion on improving the health and wellbeing of people from birth to old age and support better lives and brighter futures for the country, and how a life course approach can help us to better understand the impact of events and experiences during important periods of our lives.

“Taking a life course approach is about more than just producing academic outputs. Life course findings are used to inform policy and practice in Aotearoa,” says another of the organisers Dr Reremoana (Moana) Theodore, from Ageing Well and a co-Director of theNational Centre for Lifecourse Research.

Life course research helps us understand the impact of events on our health throughout our life journey. That knowledge should be able to help inform policy and practice so that individuals, whānau and communities can steer a course to more healthy lives.

Healthier Lives Director Professor Jim Mann notes that the symposium will reveal that research also needs to focus on adults and intergenerational effects.

Professor Mann will chair a session of future directions of life course that will include research from Professor Rod Jackson of the University of Auckland that has also potentially identified reversible factors in adult life.

“Life course research to date has identified many determinants of health outcomes.   I hope that discussions at the symposium will clarify which of these warrant translation into interventions which can be tested and translated into actions most likely to improve the health of all New Zealanders.”

Keynote speakers include Professor Janeen Baxter, Director of the Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course, University of Queensland, whose research focus is on the impact of intergenerational transfer of inequality, and Professor Richie Poulton, Director of the National Centre for Life course Research, University of Otago, who leads the Dunedin Study, New Zealand’s longest running longitudinal health and development study.

ENDS

 

For details of the day and programme go to http://lifecourse.nz/programme/

And follow on Twitter #lifecoursenz.

 

 

 

Filed under: Events, Research

Need for holistic approach to patient care emphasised

Ageing Well National Science Challenge Director, Professor David Baxter, addressed the National Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2018 and emphasised the need for holistic treatment of individual patients.

In a later interview with the Otago Daily Times, Professor Baxter also highlighted the need for better co-ordinated overall support from central and local government so that people in an ageing population could “age well”.

Read the complete article published in the ODT on 16th September 2018.

Filed under: Press, Research

Overmedication causing falls, injuring and killing elderly

New research shows elderly people taking high-risk sleeping and pain medications are twice as likely to fall and break bones, with up to a third dying within a year of being injured.

The world-leading study from the University of Otago, based of out Christchurch, funded by Ageing Well National Science Challenge measured the impact of taking multiple medications on fractures in the elderly.

Read the full story here.

Filed under: Press, Research

Overmedication causing falls, injuring and killing elderly

Elderly people taking high-risk sleeping and pain medications are twice as likely to fall and break bones, with up to a third dying within a year of being injured, new research shows. The world-leading study from the University of Otago, based of out Christchurch, measured the impact of taking multiple medications on fractures in the elderly.

Filed under: Press, Research

We need to talk about loneliness, New Zealand

“Modern life is making us lonely and it is something New Zealand needs to talk about”, says Ageing Well researcher Professor Merryn Gott.

University of Auckland professor of health sciences Merryn Gott has studied loneliness in the elderly as part of her research project funded by Ageing Well National Science Challenge.

Read the full story, which was recently featured in Stuff.

Filed under: Press, Research

Family members caring for elderly Pasifika at end of life not getting help – study

Most Pacific Islanders in New Zealand spend the end of their lives being cared for by family members who aren’t getting all the help they’re entitled to, our “Tapinga ‘a Maama’: Pacific Life and Death in Advanced Age” study has revealed. This AWNSC research project is carried out by Dr Ofa Dewes in the School of Nursing at the University of Auckland.

This project was streamed online at 1 NEWS (23th July, 2018): Family members caring for elderly Pasifika at end of life not getting help – study. 

For more information related to this project follow the link.

Filed under: Press, Research